The Texas Restaurant Association (TRA) led a coalition of business groups and their communities to drive support to the industry, for SB 8, the federal pandemic relief bill that included $180 million for local hospitality and tourism businesses. 

"I am so proud that the Texas Restaurant Association led this initiative, which would not have succeeded without the powerful voices of restaurants and many other hospitality and tourism businesses from across the state," said Emily Williams Knight, Ed.D., President & CEO of the TRA. "This grant program cannot reverse all of the damage that the industry has suffered during the pandemic, but it will be incredibly meaningful to thousands of restaurants, theaters, distilleries, and other businesses that need a jumpstart to turn the corner and rebuild. Even more than that, by dedicating $180 million to help the hospitality and tourism industry recover, our lawmakers have made an important statement, confirming our state's commitment to the local businesses that have suffered greatly over the past 18 months and yet continue to struggle because they want to continue to serve their communities. We cannot afford to lose these local businesses, and I'm proud that the investment in SB 8 will go a long way towards protecting the institutions that make Texas so special."

To add hospitality and tourism grant funding to SB 8, the TRA worked closely with the following organizations: Texas Travel Alliance, Texas Distilled Spirits Association, Theatre Owners of Mid-America, Texas Hotel & Lodging Association, Texas Wine & Grape Growers Association, Texas Campgrounds, Texas Craft Brewers Guild, NFIB, and Texas Live Events Coalition. Together, these groups represent tens of thousands of local businesses covering every aspect of the hospitality and tourism industry in Texas.

The Hilton Dallas Lincoln Centre completed its $24 million renovation of the entire hotel and conference center. Renovations began in 2020. 

The North Dallas conference center hotel renovation includes a full redesign of all 503 guest rooms, lobby and public areas, and food and beverage outlets. Additionally, the hotel’s 55,000-square-feet of meeting space was updated with new furnishings, technology upgrades, and the addition of a new 6,600-square-foot Lakeside Ballroom. 

 

Anchorage is a city like none other—making it a popular choice for hosting meetings and events.

Through the tall windows of the Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center in Anchorage, meeting attendees can gaze out toward Cook Inlet, which stretches all the way to the Gulf of Alaska and toward mountains—some snow-capped—representing several ranges. They may even see an eagle fly by or see one of the 1,500 moose that are said to roam Alaska’s largest city. It’s easy to see why it’s said that Anchorage is a city like none other in the United States.

 

In early June, the City Council of Tyler called a special meeting to name its Rose Complex's conference center. The center will be called the W.T. Brookshire Conference Center after the iconic grocery store founded and headquartered in Tyler. 

"Brookshire's tradition of outstanding service was instilled 90 years ago when W.T. Brookshire made the decision to place the customer as his top priority," says Mayor Don Warren. 

After the name was announced, attendees for the momentous occasion signed the complex girders to commemorate the occasion.