• Event Snapshot: Keels & Wheels Uncorked

     
    FROM THE Summer 2015 ISSUE
     

    1. Mister French’s Gourmet Bakery.

  • Event Snapshot: Keels & Wheels Uncorked

     
    FROM THE Summer 2015 ISSUE
     

    2. Whole Foods offers appetizers to eventgoers.

  • Event Snapshot: Keels & Wheels Uncorked

     
    FROM THE Summer 2015 ISSUE
     

    3. Chris Swanson—pro- ducer of Eyes on Houston, the Houston Chronicle society video blog—interviews Amy and Paul Dunphey, the chairs of the sixth annual Keels & Wheels Uncorked event.

  • Event Snapshot: Keels & Wheels Uncorked

     
    FROM THE Summer 2015 ISSUE
     

    4. Master of Ceremonies Sam Malone hosts the charity auction.

  • Event Snapshot: Keels & Wheels Uncorked

     
    FROM THE Summer 2015 ISSUE
     

    5. Scott French of Mister French’s Gourmet Bakery with milk chocolate and dark chocolate cookie bonbons.

  • Event Snapshot: Keels & Wheels Uncorked

     
    FROM THE Summer 2015 ISSUE
     

    6. Concourse Chairman Bob Fuller and a 1961 Ferrari 250 GTE.

  • Event Snapshot: Keels & Wheels Uncorked

     
    FROM THE Summer 2015 ISSUE
     

    7. Richard Gruen, director of development and communi- cations, Boys & Girls Harbor.

  • Event Snapshot: Keels & Wheels Uncorked

     
    FROM THE Summer 2015 ISSUE
     

    8. Carmelo’s Ristorante Italiano serves Pollo Ossobuco over wild mushroom risotto, paired with a Pinot Grigio San Angelo Banfi wine.

The sixth annual Keels & Wheels Uncorked was March 26 at Rolls Royce/ Bentley Houston. The Uncorked event was hosted by The 20th Annual Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance, and was a fundraiser for Boys & Girls Harbor. Guests enjoyed an elegant evening of fine wines, exceptional food and classic automobiles. 

You don't have to spend a fortune on a corporate outing to make a big impact. Texas-based Small Giants Community founder Paul Spiegelman’s corporate picnic at the Lonesome Dove Ranch was so inspiring, he wrote an article about it for Inc.com. “Oftentimes, employee perks are the fi rst cuts to improve margins,” Spiegelman writes. “Don’t do it. Here’s why.” 

 

This locally owned and operated steakhouse is a great place to ‘meat.’