Foodie Culture Hits Gettysburg

The Civil War may be the first thing that comes to one’s mind when thinking of Gettysburg, but a close second should be the food offerings available to the nearly 3.7 million visitors and thousands of meeting and conference attendees each year.

“Food is at the heart of all great meetings and conferences,” says Norris Flowers, president, Destination Gettysburg. “Destinations around the country aren’t just looking at food as simply meals that meeting attendees need, but rather experiences that are sometimes at the very core of their conference itself.”

Nestled in Adams County, the area has always had an abundance of options, but as of late, the more food-related tourism options have popped up. Visitors can peruse orchards, farmers markets and vineyards. Additionally, restaurants have started using local ingredients.

Two wineries have opened their doors in which meeting planners can advise attendees to visit. The opening of both was likely bolstered by the creation of the Gettysburg Wine & Fruit Trail, a collection of orchards, markets and wineries in the area. There is also a Savor Gettysburg Food Tour, a Savory Sweets Tour and a Gettysburg Wine, Cider and Dine Tour.

With all of the new tourism options, Destination Gettysburg has ramped up its marketing tactics, showing off the culinary experience as well as the area’s history and heritage.

“What’s most exciting about this development is that it defines our destination in its entirety—not just Gettysburg, not just the battlefield, but Adams County as a full experience,” says Jenny McConnell, sales director, Destination Gettysburg. “This experience is bringing meeting planners from their conference rooms into the farms, wineries and restaurants in several communities that surround Gettysburg, and that’s a victory for us all.”

Born and raised in Bryan, about 90 miles east of Village of Salado, Chadley Hollas, Village of Salado’s director of tourism, says he came to the town with one goal: to help Salado become Texas’ best small destination. His favorite thing about his adopted hometown is the people. “They are quirky, creative and hospitable—a neat combination that makes for many good conversations,” says Hollas.

 

Because Texas shares a border with Mexico, there are lots of reasons to visit the state aside from its amazing Tex-Mex cuisine. It’s the second biggest state in the USA, both by area and population, and if you want to get off the beaten path, you’ll find some really cool things to do that will make unforgettable memories of your holiday in the Lone Star State.