• MAIN ST. art festival to take over Fort Worth for 30th year

     
    POSTED February 26, 2015
     
  • MAIN ST. art festival to take over Fort Worth for 30th year

     
    POSTED February 26, 2015
     
  • MAIN ST. art festival to take over Fort Worth for 30th year

     
    POSTED February 26, 2015
     
MAIN ST. Fort Worth Arts Festival, the largest art festival in Texas, will celebrate its 30th year April 9-12. Spanning 25 city blocks to showcase 215 artists from around the country, the event is also the city’s largest music festival.
 
Only 14 percent of the 1,345 applicants have been selected to exhibit this year, featuring 15 mediums, including ceramics, jewelry, mixed-media, printmaking, digital, fiber, leather, painting, drawing and pastels, glass, metalwork, photography and wood. The organizers predict more than $4.6 million worth or art will be sold. There will also be a Young People’s Art Fair with work from more than 200 young artists available for purchase.
 
The festival is a nationally recognized event and a three-time winner of the Grand Pinnacle award from the International Festivals and Events Association. It is also one of top ten arts festivals in the U.S., according to the Art Fair Sourcebook.
 
“Over the past three decades, MAIN ST. has become one of the most attended and celebrated arts festivals in the country, with tens of thousands coming together to enjoy one of the world’s largest outdoor art galleries and music venues,” said  Larry Anfin, chairman of the festivals and events committee for Downtown Fort Worth Initiatives, Inc., which organizes the event.  “The original hope that MAIN ST. would someday become a multi-faceted festival that would transform downtown into an outdoor gallery and concert stage has not only come to life, but has exceeded what anyone thought was possible.”
 
For more information about the festival and event schedule visit the website

Due to COVID-19, non-essential travel was, or has been, banned for months. Long anticipated trips and in-person gatherings were canceled and people have adjusted to the new normal: staying at home and meeting over Zoom. However, states have been slowly lifting restrictions, and non-essential travel will soon be happening across the country again. However, some may not be as comfortable with the thought of traveling as they were before the pandemic.  

 

Daily life has been significantly altered by COVID-19, no matter the industry. Many are working from home, while children stay inside for online schooling. Meetings and events have been hit especially hard, since the essence of the industry is face-to-face interactions. While we continue to self-isolate, plenty of organizations have been offering webinars with insights on how to handle the pandemic—watching webinars is a great way to use that extra time you might have used for your commute to learn something useful.

 

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.