• Ocean County Tourism Still Going Strong

     
    POSTED October 8, 2015
     

Ocean County’s tourism industry in New Jersey continues to get bigger and bigger. And, according to Joseph H. Vicari, freeholder and chairman, Department of Business Development and Tourism, there’s nowhere to go but up.

 “Tourism is a $4.3 billion industry in Ocean County, but by the end of this year I’m predicting it will be at $4.4 billion,” he says. “Every dollar that tourism brings into the county circulates seven times, providing jobs, paying taxes and strengthening our local economy.”

Reports show this past summer was strong, with visitors prominently visiting the beaches and business Ocean County has to offer.

 “Our number one draw is still our 44 miles of coastline and beaches,” says Vicari. “But people also come for the museums, the farmlands, Six Flags and the Lakewood Blue Claws.”

Those visitors are a boom for local businesses, the vast majority of which are small Mom and Pop stores, restaurants and other establishments. Vicari, who serves as Chairman of the Department of Business Development and Tourism, said he’s worked closely with local businesses, and chambers of commerce to entice more visitors to the county.

But the success doesn’t stop with the coming of fall.

“Our season lasts all year,” says Vicari. “There is always something to do in Ocean County. The fall brings with it such popular events as Chowderfest in Beach Haven, the Decoy and Gunning Show in Tuckerton, pumpkin picking in Plumsted and the Seaside Heights Columbus Day Parade and Italian Festival.”

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Sunday recommended that all gatherings of more than 50 people be cancelled or postponed for the next eight weeks, in order to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. The recommendation covers events like parades, concerts, festivals, conferences, sporting events, weddings and more.

 

Modern ingenuity, local history and curiosity shape the foundation that will soon be home to the new Hyatt Centric Congress Avenue Austin hotel. Expected to open in the fall of 2021, Colorado-based real estate investor and developer McWHINNEY has big plans for this full-service lifestyle hotel.