South by Southwest (SXSW) returned live this year! The 35-year-old festival infuses on average $16-plus million of consumer spending into the Austin music scene over the course of nine days. The festival returned in March after its cancellation in 2020 and virtual show in 2021. Both the cancellation and virtual show were prompted by health and safety concerns due to the pandemic. 

Founded in 1987, SXSW has grown from a small collection of concerts centered around downtown Austin's Sixth Street to one of the most important media and industry exhibitions in the world. In 2019, the year before the pandemic, SXSW generated more than $355 million in economic impact for the city.

Tom Noon, president and CEO of Visit Austin, said he was excited to see the in-person return of SXSW. "SXSW is one of the top economic drivers for so many of our local businesses, live music venues, restaurants and hotels."

Planners looking for a destination with an array of venue types, all catering to small-scaled meetings, and fun after-hours entertainment need look no further than McKinney, located just 30 miles north of Dallas. Whether historic, nature-based, modern, or situated in a Croatian village, McKinney’s venues are designed to meet your needs and exceed your expectations.

 

Engage with peers and leaders in Plano, Texas, during this learning and networking event.

The Texas Association of Convention & Visitor Bureaus has announced the location of its 2023 Winter Conference. Attendees will gather in Plano, Texas, from January 17-20, 2023. The yearly event gives destination marketing organization staff and leadership the opportunity to learn from expert presenters, meet industry mentors, and find camaraderie in an atmosphere of learning and innovation.

 

Event hosts can choose whether the view rotates or stays put.

The iconic Reunion Tower in downtown Dallas will soon welcome a new restaurant, Crown Block steakhouse. Reunion Tower restaurants have been renown over the years for their slowly rotating view of the city. However, owners and husband-wife business partners Kim Canteenwalla and Elizabeth Blau have chosen to keep the dining area stationary. The previous restaurant, Wolfgang Puck’s Five Sixty, spun 360 degrees, but it closed in 2020 during the pandemic.